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Suggested Citation:"IV. Stress and Nutrient Interactions: Metabolic Consequences." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Food Components to Enhance Performance: An Evaluation of Potential Performance-Enhancing Food Components for Operational Rations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4563.
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PART IV
Stress and Nutrient Interactions: Metabolic Consequences

IN PART IV THE EXPERT PAPERS that formed the basis for the development of the basic science summary and recommendations in Part I begin. Speakers were selected who were well known for their research in specific areas. Each speaker was asked to review carefully the literature in his or her field of expertise as it related to the six questions posed to the committee and to provide copies of scientific articles as background papers to the CMNR before the workshop. In their presentations and chapters, the invited experts were asked to make critical comments on the relevant research and conclude with their recommendations. When time allowed, there was a recorded question and answer period at the end of each presentation. These discussions are included at the end of the chapters.

Reviewed in this section are the biochemical basis underlying L-tyrosine administration to counter stress; a broad overview of endocrine system responses to military-type stresses; and the nutritional, endocrinological, and physiological aspects of metabolism needed to sustain physical and mental performance under a variety of stressful conditions.

Suggested Citation:"IV. Stress and Nutrient Interactions: Metabolic Consequences." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Food Components to Enhance Performance: An Evaluation of Potential Performance-Enhancing Food Components for Operational Rations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4563.
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Suggested Citation:"IV. Stress and Nutrient Interactions: Metabolic Consequences." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Food Components to Enhance Performance: An Evaluation of Potential Performance-Enhancing Food Components for Operational Rations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4563.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"IV. Stress and Nutrient Interactions: Metabolic Consequences." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Food Components to Enhance Performance: An Evaluation of Potential Performance-Enhancing Food Components for Operational Rations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4563.
×
Page 160
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The physiological or psychological stresses that employees bring to their workplace affect not only their own performance but that of their co-workers and others. These stresses are often compounded by those of the job itself. Medical personnel, firefighters, police, and military personnel in combat settings--among others--experience highly unpredictable timing and types of stressors.

This book reviews and comments on the performance-enhancing potential of specific food components. It reflects the views of military and non-military scientists from such fields as neuroscience, nutrition, physiology, various medical specialties, and performance psychology on the most up-to-date research available on physical and mental performance enhancement in stressful conditions. Although placed within the context of military tasks, the volume will have wide-reaching implications for individuals in any job setting.

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