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Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects (2018)

Chapter: Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
×
Page 174
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
×
Page 175
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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F Committee and Staff Biographical Information COMMITTEE MARK A. HOROWITZ, Chair, is the Yahoo! Founders Professor at Stanford University and was chair of the Electrical Engineering Department from 2008 to 2012. He received his B.S. and M.S. in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978, and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1984. Dr. Horowitz has received many awards, including a 1985 Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1993 ISSCC Best Paper Award, the ISCA 2004 Most Influential Paper of 1989, the 2006 Don Pederson IEEE Technical Field Award, the 2011 SIA Faculty Researcher Award, and the ChipEx Global Leadership Award in 2015. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science. Dr. Horowitz’s research interests are quite broad and span using electrical engineering and computer science analysis methods to problems in molecular biology to creating new design methodologies for analog and digital Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits. He has worked on many processor designs, from early reduced instruction set computer (RISC) chips to creating some of the first distributed shared memory multiprocessors, and is currently working on creating very power efficient systems using specialized accelerators. Recently he has worked on a number of problems in computational photography. In 1990, he took leave from Stanford to help start Rambus, Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology, and his work at both Rambus and Stanford drove high-speed I/O for over a decade. ALÁN ASPURU-GUZIK is currently a Canada 150 Research Chair in quantum chemistry and a professor of chemistry and computer science at the University of Toronto. He is also a faculty member of the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence and a CIFAR senior fellow. Dr. Aspuru-Guzik was a professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard University, where he started his independent career in 2006 and was promoted to associate professor in 2010 and full professor from 2013 to 2018. Dr. Aspuru-Guzik received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1999. He received the Gabino Barreda Medal from UNAM, which prizes the top achiever in each field of study. After receiving his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2004, under Professor William A. Lester Jr., he was a postdoctoral scholar in the group of Martin Head-Gordon at the University of California, Berkeley, from 2005-2006. Professor Aspuru-Guzik carries out research at the interface of computer science, physics, and chemistry. In particular, he has pioneered the interface of quantum information and chemistry, with special focus on early applications of quantum computers such as dedicated quantum simulators for chemical systems. Dr. Aspuru-Guzik carries out research on materials acceleration platforms (MAPs), which integrate artificial intelligence, high-throughput quantum chemical screening, and robotics to accelerate materials discovery. Applications include organic semiconductors, photovoltaics, organic batteries, and organic light-emitting diodes. In 2009, Professor Aspuru-Guzik received the DARPA Young Faculty Award, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the Sloan Research Fellowship. In 2010, he received the Everett-Mendelsohn Graduate Mentoring Award and received the HP Outstanding Junior Faculty Award PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-1

from the Computers in Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society. In the same year, he was selected as a Top Innovator under 35 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Review magazine. In 2012, he was elected as a fellow of the American Physical Society, and in 2013, he received the ACS Early Career Award in Theoretical Chemistry. He is associate editor of the journal Chemical Science. DAVID D. AWSCHALOM is Liew Family Professor in Spintronics and Quantum Information and deputy director at the Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME) at the University of Chicago. He was a research staff member and manager of the Nonequilibrium Physics Department at the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. In 1991, Dr, Awschalom joined the University of California, Santa Barbara, as a professor of physics, and in 2001 was additionally appointed as a professor of electrical and computer engineering. Prior to joining IME, he served as the Peter J. Clarke Professor and director of the California NanoSystems Institute and as director of the Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation. Professor Awschalom received the American Physical Society Oliver E. Buckley Prize and Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize, the European Physical Society Europhysics Prize, the Materials Research Society David Turnbull Award and Outstanding Investigator Prize, the AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the International Magnetism Prize and the Néel Medal from the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, and an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the European Academy of Sciences. Dr. Awschalom received his B.Sc. in physics from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in experimental physics from Cornell University. BOB BLAKLEY is the global director of information security innovation at Citigroup. He recently served as plenary chair of the NSTIC Identity Ecosystem Steering Group and as research and development co- chair of the Financial Services Sector Coordinating Council (FSSCC) for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Homeland Security. He is currently a member of the Forum on Cyber Resilience—a National Academies Roundtable. Prior to joining Citigroup, Dr. Blakley was distinguished analyst and agenda manager for identity and privacy at Gartner and Burton Group. Before that, he was chief scientist for security and privacy at IBM. He is past general chair of the IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium and the ACSA New Security Paradigms workshop. He was awarded the ACSAC Distinguished Security Practitioner Award in 2002, and is a frequent speaker at information security and computer industry events. Dr. Blakley was general editor of the OMG CORBASecurity specification and the OASIS SAML specification, and is the author of CORBASecurity: An Introduction to Safe Computing with Objects, published by Addison-Wesley. He was the first chair of the OATH Joint Coordinating Committee. He also participated in the National Academy of Sciences panels “Authentication Technologies and Their Privacy Implications” and “Whither Biometrics.” Dr. Blakley holds 20 patents in cryptography and information security, and he publishes regularly in the academic literature on information security and privacy. He received an A.B. in classics from Princeton University, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in computer and communications science from the University of Michigan. DAN BONEH is a professor of computer science and heads the applied cryptography group at Stanford University, where he has been on the faculty since 1997. Dr. Boneh’s research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, Web security, security for mobile devices, digital copyright protection, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and a recipient of the Packard Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Award, and the RSA award in mathematics. In 2011, Dr. Boneh received the Ishii Award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University. SUSAN COPPERSMITH is the Robert E. Fassnacht and a Vilas Research Professor of Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a theoretical condensed matter physicist who has worked on a broad range of problems in the area of complex systems and has made substantial contributions to the PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-2

understanding of subjects including glasses, granular materials, the nonlinear dynamics of magnetic flux lattices in type-II superconductors, and quantum computing. Dr. Coppersmith has served as chair of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Physics Department, as a member of the NORDITA advisory board, as a member of the Mathematical and Physical Science Advisory Committee of the National Science Foundation, and as a trustee at the Aspen Center for Physics. She has served as chair of the Division of Condensed Matter Physics of the American Physical Society, chair of the Section on Physics of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, chair of the Board of Trustees of the Gordon Research Conferences, and chair of the External Advisory Board of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Coppersmith is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Coppersmith received her Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University. JUNGSANG KIM is a professor in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Physics, and Computer Science at Duke University. Dr. Kim leads the Multifunctional Integrated Systems Technology group at Duke University, where his group uses trapped atomic ions and a range of photonics technologies in an effort to construct scalable quantum information processors and quantum communication networks. After his thesis work on semiconductor-based single-photon sources and detectors, he joined Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, in 1999, where he served as a member of technical staff and a technical manager. His work at Bell Labs included development of novel optical and wireless communication gear. Since joining Duke University in 2004, he shifted his research focus to quantum information processing and high-resolution optical sensors. He pioneered introduction of new technologies, such as microfabricated ion traps, optical micro-electromechanical systems, advanced single-photon detectors, compact cryogenics, and vacuum technologies, toward a functional integration of quantum computers using trapped ions. In 2015, he co-founded IonQ, Inc., with Professor Christopher Monroe at the University of Maryland, leading the commercialization effort of trapped ion quantum computers. He is a fellow of the OSA, and a senior member of IEEE. Dr. Kim received his bachelor’s degree from Seoul National University, and his Ph.D degree from Stanford University, both in physics. JOHN M. MARTINIS is a professor of physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and works with Google to build quantum computers. Dr. Martinis’s thesis was a pioneering demonstration of quantum-bit states in superconductors. After completing a post-doctoral position at the Commisiariat Energie Atomic in Saclay, France, he joined the Electromagnetic Technology Division at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado. At NIST, he developed a new fundamental electrical standard based on counting electrons, and invented microcalorimeters based on superconducting sensors for x-ray microanalysis and astrophysics measurements. In 2004, he moved to UCSB, where he currently holds the Worster Chair in experimental physics. At UCSB, he has continued work on quantum computation, demonstrating a variety of new quantum devices and capabilities. Along with Andrew Cleland, he was awarded in 2010 the AAAS science breakthrough of the year for an experiment showing the first quantum behavior of a mechanical oscillator. In 2014, he was awarded the London Prize for low-temperature physics research. In 2014, he joined the Google Quantum-AI team, and he now heads an effort to build the first practical quantum computer. Dr. Martinis attended the University of California, Berkeley, from 1976 to 1987, where he received two degrees in physics: B.S. (1980) and Ph.D. (1987). MARGARET MARTONOSI is the Hugh Trumbull Adams ’35 Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. She is also director of the Princeton Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education, and an A.D. White Visiting Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. From August 2015 through March 2017, Dr. Martonosi served as a Jefferson Science Fellow within the U.S. Department of State. Dr. Martonosi’s research interests are in computer architecture and mobile computing. Her work has included the development of the Wattch power PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-3

modeling tool and the Princeton ZebraNet mobile sensor network project for the design and real-world deployment of zebra tracking collars in Kenya. Her current research focuses on hardware-software interface approaches in both classical and quantum computing systems. Dr. Martonosi is a fellow of both IEEE and ACM. Her papers have received numerous long-term impact awards including the 2015 ISCA Long-Term Influential Paper Award, 2017 ACM SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Award, 2017 ACM SenSys Test-of-Time Paper Award, 2018 (Inaugural) HPCA Test-of-Time Paper Award, and inclusion on the 2013 list of 25 most significant papers from the first 20 years of FCCM. Other notable awards include the 2018 IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award, 2010 Princeton University Graduate Mentoring Award, the 2013 NCWIT Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award, the 2013 Anita Borg Institute Technical Leadership Award, and the 2015 Marie Pistilli Women in EDA Achievement Award. In addition to many archival publications, Martonosi is an inventor on seven granted U.S. patents, and has co-authored two technical reference books on power-aware computer architecture. Dr. Martonosi completed her Ph.D. at Stanford University, and also holds a master’s degree from Stanford and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, all in electrical engineering. MICHELE MOSCA is co-founder of the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, a professor in the Department of Combinatorics and Optimization of the Faculty of Mathematics, and a founding member of the Waterloo Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. Dr. Mosca was the founding director of CryptoWorks21, a training program in quantum-safe cryptography. He co-founded the ETSI-IQC workshop series in quantum-safe cryptography, which brings together a broad range of stakeholders working toward globally standardized quantum-safe cryptography. He co-founded evolutionQ, Inc., in order to support organizations as they evolve their quantum-vulnerable systems and practices to quantum-safe ones and softwareQ, Inc., to provide quantum software tools and services. Dr. Mosca obtained his doctorate in mathematics in 1999 from the University of Oxford on the topic of quantum computer algorithms. His research interests include quantum computation and cryptographic tools that will be safe against quantum technologies. He is globally recognized for his drive to help academia, industry, and government prepare our cyber systems to be safe in an era with quantum computers. Dr. Mosca’s work is published widely in top journals, and he co-authored the respected textbook An Introduction to Quantum Computing (Oxford University Press). Dr. Mosca has won numerous awards and honors, including 2010 Canada’s Top 40 under 40, the Premier’s Research Excellence Award (2000-2005), fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) since 2010, Canada Research Chair in Quantum Computation (2002-2012), University Research Chair at the University of Waterloo (2012-present), Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal (2013), SJU Fr. Norm Choate Lifetime Achievement Award (2017), and a knighthood (Cavaliere) in the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic (2018). WILLIAM D. OLIVER is a laboratory fellow at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, professor of the practice in the MIT Physics Department, and associate director of the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics. Dr. Oliver is a principal investigator in the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) and the Engineering Quantum Systems Group (MIT campus), where he provides programmatic and technical leadership for programs related to the development of quantum and classical high-performance computing technologies for quantum information science applications. His interests include the materials growth, fabrication, design, and measurement of superconducting qubits, as well as the development of cryogenic packaging and control electronics involving cryogenic CMOS and single- flux quantum digital logic. Dr. Oliver received his Ph.D in electrical engineering from Stanford University. KRYSTA SVORE is a principal research manager at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, where she leads the Quantum Architectures and Computation group. Dr. Svore’s research includes the development and implementation of quantum algorithms, including the design of a software architecture for translating a high-level quantum program into a low-level, device-specific quantum implementation, PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-4

and the study of quantum error correction codes to enable fault tolerance and scalability. She has also developed machine-learning methods for Web applications, including ranking, classification, and summarization algorithms. Dr. Svore received an ACM Best of 2013 Notable Article award. In 2010, she was a member of the winning team of the Yahoo! Learning to Rank Challenge. She is a senior member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), serves as a representative for the Academic Alliance of the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), and is an active member of the American Physical Society (APS). She currently serves as chair of the steering committee for the Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Conference. Dr. Svore received her Ph.D. in computer science with highest distinction from Columbia University in 2006 and her B.A. from Princeton University in mathematics and French in 2001. UMESH V. VAZIRANI is the Roger A. Strauch Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and the director of the Berkeley Quantum Computation Center. His research interests lie primarily in quantum computing. He is also the author of a textbook on algorithms. Dr. Vazirani is one of the founders of the field of quantum computing. His 1993 paper with his student Ethan Bernstein on quantum complexity theory defined a model of quantum Turing machines that was amenable to complexity-based analysis. This paper also gave an algorithm for the quantum Fourier transform, which was then used by Peter Shor within a year in his celebrated quantum algorithm for factoring integers. Dr. Vaziriani received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. STAFF EMILY GRUMBLING is a program officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies. Dr. Grumbling previously served as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow in the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the National Science Foundation (2012-2014), and an ACS Congressional Fellow in the U.S. House of Representatives (2011-2012). She received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Arizona in 2010, and her B.A. with a double major in chemistry and film/electronic media arts from Bard College in 2004. JON EISENBERG is the senior board director of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Dr. Eisenberg has also been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications technologies. In 1995-1997, he was an AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on technology transfer and information and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Eisenberg received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1988. KATIRIA ORTIZ is an associate program officer for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Ms. Ortiz previously served as an intern under the U.S. Department of Justice and as an undergraduate research assistant at the Cybersecurity Quantification Laboratory at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her M.A. in international science and technology policy from The George Washington University and her B.S. in cell biology and molecular genetics and B.A. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland, College Park. JANKI PATEL is a senior program assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Ms. Patel has also formerly worked as a program assistant with the Board on PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-5

Energy and Environmental Systems at the National Academies and as a geotechnical engineering lab assistant for AB Consultants, Inc., in Lanham, Maryland. She received a B.S. in physical sciences with a primary concentration in atmospheric and oceanic sciences, geology, and environmental science and technology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She is currently in the process of receiving her M.S. in environmental management and technology from the University of Maryland, University College. SHENAE BRADLEY is an administrative assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Ms. Bradley currently provides support to the Continuing Innovation in Information Technology; Information Technology, Automation, and the U.S. Workforce; and Towards 21st Century Cyber-Physical Systems Education panels, among others. Prior to this, she served as a senior project assistant with the board. Before coming to the National Academies, Ms. Bradley managed a number of apartment rental communities for Edgewood Management Corporation in the Maryland/DC/Delaware metropolitan areas. Ms. Bradley is in the process of earning her B.S. in family studies from the University of Maryland, College Park. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION F-6

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Quantum mechanics, the subfield of physics that describes the behavior of very small (quantum) particles, provides the basis for a new paradigm of computing. First proposed in the 1980s as a way to improve computational modeling of quantum systems, the field of quantum computing has recently garnered significant attention due to progress in building small-scale devices. However, significant technical advances will be required before a large-scale, practical quantum computer can be achieved.

Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects provides an introduction to the field, including the unique characteristics and constraints of the technology, and assesses the feasibility and implications of creating a functional quantum computer capable of addressing real-world problems. This report considers hardware and software requirements, quantum algorithms, drivers of advances in quantum computing and quantum devices, benchmarks associated with relevant use cases, the time and resources required, and how to assess the probability of success.

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