National Academies Press: OpenBook

Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects (2018)

Chapter: Appendix G: Briefers to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Briefers to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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Page 177
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Briefers to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25196.
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Page 178

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G Briefers to the Committee MARCH 23-24, 2017 Brad Blakestad, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity Alex Cronin, National Science Foundation Jake Farinholt, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division David Honey, Office of the Director of National Intelligence Michael Mandelberg, Laboratory for Physical Sciences Dmitry Maslov, National Science Foundation Dustin Moody, National Institute of Standards and Technology Ceren Susut-Bennett, Department of Energy Carl Williams, National Institute of Standards and Technology JUNE 15-16, 2017 Bela Bauer, Microsoft Research Ken Brown, Georgia Institute of Technology Eric Dauler, MIT Lincoln Labs Austin Fowler, Google Jay Gambetta, IBM Research Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratory Chris Monroe, University of Maryland Markus Reiher, ETH Zurich John Sarrao, Los Alamos National Laboratory Rob Schoelkopf, Yale University Nathan Wiebe, Microsoft Research Will Zeng, Rigetti Computing JULY 20-21, 2017 Dan Bernstein, University of Illinois Gary Bronner, Rambus Bob Colwell, Independent Consultant Norbert Holtkamp, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Mark Johnson, D-Wave Systems Mark Kasevich, Stanford University Helmut Katzgraber, Texas A&M University Adam Langley, Google PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION G-1

Chris Peikert, University of Michigan Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz, NASA Ames Research Center John Shalf, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION G-2

Next: Appendix H: Acronyms and Abbreviations »
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Quantum mechanics, the subfield of physics that describes the behavior of very small (quantum) particles, provides the basis for a new paradigm of computing. First proposed in the 1980s as a way to improve computational modeling of quantum systems, the field of quantum computing has recently garnered significant attention due to progress in building small-scale devices. However, significant technical advances will be required before a large-scale, practical quantum computer can be achieved.

Quantum Computing: Progress and Prospects provides an introduction to the field, including the unique characteristics and constraints of the technology, and assesses the feasibility and implications of creating a functional quantum computer capable of addressing real-world problems. This report considers hardware and software requirements, quantum algorithms, drivers of advances in quantum computing and quantum devices, benchmarks associated with relevant use cases, the time and resources required, and how to assess the probability of success.

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