National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Operations Training at Small Airports (2020)

Chapter: Appendix C - Learning Styles Inventory

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Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Learning Styles Inventory." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Airport Operations Training at Small Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25948.
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Page 75
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Learning Styles Inventory." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Airport Operations Training at Small Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25948.
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Page 76

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75 Sample online learning style assessments: Made available by the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency, this site presents a 20-question learning style assessment, as well as study habits and character development: http://www.educationplanner.org/students/self-assessments/learning-styles-quiz.shtml This 14-question learning style inventory, which may be printed out, focuses on visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles. It also includes learning style study strategies: https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Special-Education-Services/Documents/ IDEAS%202014%20Handouts/LearningStyleInventory.pdf This 25-question learning style inventory includes hints for each learning style: https://www.mbaea.org/media/documents/learningstyleinventory_survey_1F84C345CE750.pdf The following sample learning style assessment is from the Georgia Department of Education (https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Special-Education-Services/ Documents/IDEAS%202014%20Handouts/LearningStyleInventory.pdf ): Directions: Circle the letter before the statement that best describes you. 1. If I have to learn how to do something, I learn best when I: (V) Watch someone show me how. (A) Hear someone tell me how. (K) Try to do it myself. 2. When I read, I often find that I: (V) Visualize what I am reading in my mind’s eye. (A) Read out loud or hear the words inside my head. (K) Fidget and try to “feel” the content. 3. When asked to give directions, I: (V) See the actual places in my mind as I say them or prefer to draw them. (A) Have no difficulty in giving them verbally. (K) Have to point or move my body as I give them. 4. If I am unsure how to [do something, I:] (V) Write it in order to determine if it looks right. (A) Spell it out loud in order to determine if it sounds right. (K) Write it in order to determine if it feels right. 5. When I write I: (V) Am concerned with how neat and well spaced my letters and words appear. (A) Often say the letters and words to myself. (K) Push hard on my [pen] or pencil and can feel the flow of the words. 6. If I had to remember a list of items, I would remember it best if [I]: (V) Wrote them down. (A) Said them over and over to myself. (K) Moved around and used my fingers to name each item. A P P E N D I X C Learning Styles Inventory

76 Airport Operations Training at Small Airports 7. I prefer teachers who: (V) Use a board or overhead projector while they lecture. (A) Talk with lots of expression. (K) Use hands-on activities. 8. When trying to concentrate, I have a difficult time when: (V) There is a lot of clutter or movement in the room. (A) There is a lot of noise in the room. (K) I have to sit still for any length of time. 9. When solving a problem, I: (V) Write or draw diagrams to see it. (A) Talk myself through it. (K) Use my entire body or move objects to help me think. 10. When given written instructions on how to build something, I: (V) Read them silently and try to visualize how the parts will fit together. (A) Read them out loud and talk to myself as I put the parts together. (K) Try to put the parts together first and read later. 11. To keep occupied while waiting, I: (V) Look around, stare, or read. (A) Talk or listen to others. (K) Walk around, manipulate things with my hands, or move/shake my feet as I sit. 12. If I had to verbally describe something to another person, I would: (V) Be brief because I do not like to talk at length. (A) Go into great detail because I like to talk. (K) Gesture and move around while talking. 13. If someone were verbally describing something to another person, I would: (V) Try to visualize what he/she was saying. (A) Enjoy listening but want to interrupt and talk myself. (K) Become bored if her/his description got too long and detailed. 14. When trying to recall names, I remember: (V) Faces but forget names. (A) Names but forget faces. (K) The situation where I met the person rather than the person’s name or face. Scoring instructions: Add the number of responses for each letter and enter the total below. The area with the highest number of responses is your primary mode of learning. Visual Auditory Kinesthetic V= A= K=

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Managers of airports of all sizes face a perennial dilemma: how to efficiently train operations personnel to meet Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 139 requirements and ensure a safe and secure airport environment.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's ACRP Synthesis 112: Airport Operations Training at Small Airports focuses on airport operations employees and aims to better understand current training methods and programs in use by small airports in the United States (including nonhub, nonprimary commercial service, reliever, and general aviation) to initially and recurrently train airport operations employees.

Supplemental material to the report includes several appendices, including Appendix H, Appendix I, Appendix J, Appendix K, and Appendix L.

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