National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs (2019)

Chapter: Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H - Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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H-1 A P P E N D I X H Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure This appendix provides a sample training flyer and brochure that apply best practices for communicating with individuals with disabilities and access and functional needs. The appendix adapts material from two sources: • A Wikihow article co-authored by Trudi Griffin, LPC, available at https://https://m.wikihow.com/Help-Those-Who-Have-a-Disability, and • A presentation titled “Identifying and Assisting Persons in Need” by Johnson (2018), available at https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1aI5ku-GZMnxs57O-draJx1UbVkFbXe35n4rvY67- 1uc/edit?usp=sharing. Material posted to Wikihow is available for noncommercial use under a creative commons license. The flyer and brochure are provided as helpful starting points for airports wishing to develop their own materials. Airports are encouraged to ask their DAFN advisory groups to review all outreach materials before they are shared with the wider airport employee and traveler audience. Non-profit organizations also offer public-facing outreach materials. For example, the United Spinal Association offers a “Disability Etiquette” booklet that can be printed for distribution, which is available at: https://www.unitedspinal.org/pdf/DisabilityEtiquette.pdf.

H-2 Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs PRACTICE RESPECTFUL COMMUNICATION 1 MINUTE READ IT’S OKAY TO ASK QUESTIONS , IF THEY'RE RELEVANT PEOPLE FIRST LEAD THE WAY! ASK BEFORE HELPING How to Offer and Provide Assistance Respectfully Disability is not about a specific group of people. Disability is about a specific time in the life of each and every one of us. For some, it may be temporary, for others it may last much longer. As a society, we have mistakenly adopted a mindset that divides us into two groups, able bodied and disabled. The fact is that we all will be part of the disabled community for some time in our lives. If we act from the perspective of what we would want when, rather than if, we become disabled, we truly will be able to make great progress for all people. National Fire Protection Association Oftentimes, people worry about inadvertently offending someone with a disability and end up acting off or nervous during interaction. This can be alienating for someone with a disability so be sure to be yourself and stay calm. If you have any questions, it's fine to ask them if they're relevant to the situation. Put the person before the diagnosis. Disability is not the problem. A person who wears glasses doesn’t say, I have a problem seeing, they say, I wear/need glasses. Similarly, a person who uses a wheelchair doesn’t say, I have a problem walking, they say, I use/need a wheelchair. If you offer assistance, wait until the offer is accepted, then ask for instructions. Remember, everyone wants to be independent and feel respected. Would you like any help? Do you need assistance? • Let the person you are assisting know what is happening and explain what you are going to do • Keep calm • Be supportive and patient • Maintain eye contact and speak directly to the person (not to a companion, interpreter, etc.) • Speak in a normal voice. It’s okay to slow down or repeat yourself LISTEN carefully to understand and assess ENGAGE respectfully ASSIST as requested DOUBLE-CHECK to confirm understanding and uncover additional needs

Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure H-3

H-4 Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs Learn the Proper Terminology. Make sure you use the right terms when discussing people with disabilities. Certain terms that were once considered the norm are now outdated and even is learning the proper terminology. • When speaking about someone with a disability, it is often polite to place their personhood before their Do not say handicapped person. Identify them by another means (like you would anyone a wheelchair, say, person in the wheelchair or person who uses the wheelchair. Keep in mind there are a few noteworthy exceptions to this; many people in the Deaf, Blind and Autistic communities prefer language, meaning they want to be called an autistic person or a Deaf person (with the capital D indicating the identify as part of the Deaf culture). • Certain terms that were once considered politically The terms mute or dumb used to be appropriate for referring to people who cannot speak, but now terms like nonverbal or nonspeaking are preferred. Lame and crippled were once used to describe those with limited or no mobility, but now terms like physically disabled are preferred. • When in doubt, ASK questions to understand. Practice Direct Communication. Oftentimes, people with disabilities are assisted by interpreters, nurses, or friends during their day-to-day lives. It’s important that, when communicating with someone with a disability, you talk directly to that person. • Treat people like adults and speak to them accordingly. • Look at the people with a disability and not their interpreter or assistant. Oftentimes, people who are deaf look to their interpreter while another person talking as in order to follow the conversations. You should still look at the person who is deaf, however, as that is who you are communicating with, not the interpreter. • Always identify yourself. • If you are communicating with someone in a wheelchair, sit down so that they don’t strain their neck looking up at you. Avoid bending down like you would to a child; this usually looks awkward. • Don’t broadcast or yell the person’s information or their privacy. • Ask them their preference in communicating with you (ASL, pen and paper, etc.). • When in doubt, ASK questions to understand. 1 2 bui ld communicat ion sk i l l s communicate direct ly Do not filter conversation through someone else. status when communicating with other staff. Respect correct are now outdated and potentially offensive. else), and if you’re talking specifically about the use of identity-first specific condition. offensive. The first step to helping people with disabilities

Sample Staff Training Flyer and Brochure H-5 Be Respectful in Your Words and Actions. When interacting with someone with a disability, always be respectful in both your words and actions. • When introduced to someone with a disability, always . Even someone with limited hand use can usually manage this and refraining from attention to a person’s disability. • Speak in you normal voice and tone. People often feel they should speak slower or louder, especially if they’re interacting with a person who is hearing impaired, but your normal voice. • It is okay to do things to make communication easier. For example, if interacting with someone who is hard of hearing, make sure to look directly at them so they can read your lips and follow other visual cues. Sitting down to make eye contact with someone in a wheelchair can be a polite gesture. If someone has a speech impediment, rather than pretending you understand something they said when you did not, you can politely ask them to repeat it. • Be yourself during any conversation. If you accidentally use a common expression that does not apply (e.g., “see you later” to someone who visually impaired), do not panic and apologize profusely. That person will understand this is a colloquialism and not meant to be taken literally. • Don’t beat yourself up, no one expects you to be perfect. If you make a mistake, admit it and fix it. Ask Before Providing Assistance. If you see a person with a disability struggling with or intentions, you may be doing more harm than good. • Sometimes, a person with a disability may seem to be take them longer to do certain tasks, but that does not necessarily mean they need a helping hand. If you think they might need help, just ask. • If you see someone with a disability struggling, simply say “Would you like any help?” or “Do you need assistance?” You do not have to say any more than this. • day. They know their needs better than you do, and • a doctor. While suggesting yoga for someone who that person already has a doctor who knows his • When in doubt, ASK questions to understand. 43 demonstrate respect ask before helping offering a handshake, a typical gesture of courtesy, calls this can come off as rude or infantilizing. Simply talk in offer to shake hands specific medical history and giving out advice without solicitation comes off as condescending. suffers from chronic pain may seem helpful, remember Do not offer medical advice, especially if you are not pushing them would come off as rude. If someone declines your offer of assistance, do not be offended or insist on helping. Simply go on with your struggling when they are actually fine. It may simply Always ask before offering your assistance. However, without knowing that person’s specific needs something, your first instinct may be to jump in and help.

H-6 Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs 5 Ask Questions If They’re Relevant. nervous during interaction. This can be alienating for someone with a disability so be sure to be yourself and if they’re relevant to the situation. • For the most part, people with disabilities would rather you simply ask a question politely rather than remain confused. For example, it’s completely appropriate to ask someone who is deaf if they can read lips and would therefor prefer if you faced them each time you talked. If you’re planning an event and you know the wheelchair wheelchair, “Do you know where the wheelchair ramp is? • People are wary to ask questions as they do not want to call attention to someone’s disability. However, avoiding an obvious question can sometimes call more attention to the issue than simply addressing it. As long as questions are relevant to the situation at hand, they will • Plan ahead for how you could modify an action, where to get adaptive or assistive equipment, etc. • When in doubt, ASK questions to understand. ask quest ions! likely not come off as prying or insensitive. It’s hard to find and I just want to make sure you know.” ramp is in the back room, it’s fine to say to someone in a Oftentimes, people worry about inadvertently offending someone with a disability and end up acting off or stay calm. If you have any questions, it’s fine to ask them

Next: Appendix I - Exercise Toolkit »
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 201 provides guidance and tools for airports to aid in effective communication with passengers and persons with disabilities, including those with cultural and language differences.

The report includes a primer that discusses issues, techniques, and the unique requirements and challenges of communicating with people with disabilities and others who have access or functional needs.

The report explores uses of technology and other methods that incorporate ADA considerations and communication challenges with airport stakeholders, and training programs for airport personnel, including templates for development of curricula.

There are case study examples of methods of emergency communication at airports and in other industries, and for universal messaging for emergency communications.

The project that produced the report also produced templates in support of airport emergency plans specifically addressing individuals with limited English proficiency, step-by-step tools that include a needs assessment tool that airports can use to determine what steps must to be taken to comply with ADA requirements concerning communications, and templates/worksheets/checklists for planning tabletop exercises that focus on communicating with people with disabilities and access or functional needs during emergency events. These resources are described and linked to below.

  • The Inventory Checklists (from Appendix A) list plans, reports, documents, programs, and services that are helpful in emergency communications for DAFN. The checklists make it easy to review what the airport has in place, what needs to be developed or updated, etc.
  • The Accessibility Walkthrough Worksheet (from Appendix B) is a tool to structure evaluations (ideally conducted by members of a DAFN Advisory Group, as discussed in the report) that identify and assign accessibility ratings to existing communications modes and resources from curbside through baggage claim, and identify modes or resources that can be added or improved.
  • The FAA Airport Accessibility Checklist (from Appendix C) is reproduced online in PDF for convenience; a url is provided that directs users to the FAA source.
  • The Accessibility Strategy Quick Reference Guide (from Appendix D) summarizes key aspects of core, enhanced, and emerging strategies described in the report.
  • The CONOPS Template (from Appendix F) provides generic text for an Emergency Communications Concept of Operations document that airports can edit to meet their needs and those of the communities they serve.
  • The Disability Equity Training document provides training content, including empathy exercises, from Appendix G in a format that can be adapted and customized for use by practitioners.
  • The 1-Minute Read Poster (from Appendix H) provides a reproducible, one-page reference on how to offer and provide assistance respectfully to people with DAFN.
  • The Outreach Brochure (also from Appendix H) is provided in a separate downloadable file for use and distribution by practitioners.
  • The Exercise Toolkit (from Appendix I), with checklists and materials to support a discussion-based exercise and a full-scale, operational exercise, is reproduced in Word to facilitate adaptation and use by practitioners.
  • The Prepared Scenario Vignettes (from Appendix J), which can be used to lay the foundation of a discussion-based or tabletop exercise.
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