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Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Page 46
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Page 47
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25507.
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Page 48

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46 ABQ Albuquerque International Sunport AEP Airport Emergency Plan ALS amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) ANSI American National Standards Institute API application-programming interface ASL American Sign Language ATL Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport AUS Austin-Bergstrom International Airport AVL Asheville Regional Airport AZO Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport BLD Boulder City Municipal Airport BUR Hollywood Burbank (Bob Hope) Airport CBP U.S. Customs and Border Protection CID Eastern Iowa Airport CCTV closed-circuit television CFR Code of Federal Regulations CLT Charlotte Douglas International Airport CONOPS Concept of Operations CVA cerebrovascular accident (stroke) DAFN Abbreviation used to represent people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs (including, for the purpose of this document, people with limited English proficiency) DAST disability awareness and sensitivity training DEN Denver International Airport DET disability equity training DFW Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport DIK Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport DTW Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport EFD Ellington Airport EOP Emergency Operations Plan FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FLL Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport GIS geographic information system GRR Gerald R. Ford International Airport HKG Hong Kong International Airport HOU William P. Hobby Airport IAH George Bush Intercontinental Airport Abbreviations

Abbreviations 47 ICS Incident Command System ICT information and communications technology IoT Internet of things IPAWS Integrated Public Alert and Warning System ISO International Organization for Standardization JAX Jacksonville International Airport LAP Language Assistance Plan LAS McCarran International Airport LAX Los Angeles International Airport LAWA Los Angeles World Airports LEP limited English proficiency MAG Manchester Airports Group (UK) MSEL master scenario events list MSP Minneapolis–St. Paul International Airport MKE Mitchell International Airport n.d.a. no date available NRT Narita International Airport NUQ Moffett Federal Airport (Moffett Field) NWS National Weather Service ORD O’Hare International Airport PA public address PDX Portland International Airport PHX Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport PIO public information officer PIT Pittsburg International Airport RDU Raleigh–Durham International Airport RFD Chicago Rockford International Airport ROC Greater Rochester International Airport RSW Southwest Florida International Airport SaaS Software as a Service SAME specific area message encoding SARA standing and raising aid SBN South Bend International Airport SEA Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) SMF Sacramento International Airport SMS short message service (in relation to text messaging) STT speech-to-text STL Saint Louis Lambert International Airport STX Henry E. Rohlsen International Airport TDD telecommunication device for the deaf TTS text-to-speech TTY text telephone or teletypewriter TUL Tulsa International Airport UFAS Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards VoIP Voice over Internet Protocol (also called IP telephony) VRI video remote interpreting W3C World Wide Web Consortium YEG Edmonton International Airport YHZ Halifax Stanfield International Airport YOW Ottawa/Macdonald–Cartier International Airport

48 Airport Emergency Communications for People with Disabilities and Others with Access and Functional Needs YQT Thunder Bay International Airport YSJ Saint John Airport YUL Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport YVR Vancouver International Airport YWG Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport YYC Calgary International Airport YYZ Toronto Pearson International Airport

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 201 provides guidance and tools for airports to aid in effective communication with passengers and persons with disabilities, including those with cultural and language differences.

The report includes a primer that discusses issues, techniques, and the unique requirements and challenges of communicating with people with disabilities and others who have access or functional needs.

The report explores uses of technology and other methods that incorporate ADA considerations and communication challenges with airport stakeholders, and training programs for airport personnel, including templates for development of curricula.

There are case study examples of methods of emergency communication at airports and in other industries, and for universal messaging for emergency communications.

The project that produced the report also produced templates in support of airport emergency plans specifically addressing individuals with limited English proficiency, step-by-step tools that include a needs assessment tool that airports can use to determine what steps must to be taken to comply with ADA requirements concerning communications, and templates/worksheets/checklists for planning tabletop exercises that focus on communicating with people with disabilities and access or functional needs during emergency events. These resources are described and linked to below.

  • The Inventory Checklists (from Appendix A) list plans, reports, documents, programs, and services that are helpful in emergency communications for DAFN. The checklists make it easy to review what the airport has in place, what needs to be developed or updated, etc.
  • The Accessibility Walkthrough Worksheet (from Appendix B) is a tool to structure evaluations (ideally conducted by members of a DAFN Advisory Group, as discussed in the report) that identify and assign accessibility ratings to existing communications modes and resources from curbside through baggage claim, and identify modes or resources that can be added or improved.
  • The FAA Airport Accessibility Checklist (from Appendix C) is reproduced online in PDF for convenience; a url is provided that directs users to the FAA source.
  • The Accessibility Strategy Quick Reference Guide (from Appendix D) summarizes key aspects of core, enhanced, and emerging strategies described in the report.
  • The CONOPS Template (from Appendix F) provides generic text for an Emergency Communications Concept of Operations document that airports can edit to meet their needs and those of the communities they serve.
  • The Disability Equity Training document provides training content, including empathy exercises, from Appendix G in a format that can be adapted and customized for use by practitioners.
  • The 1-Minute Read Poster (from Appendix H) provides a reproducible, one-page reference on how to offer and provide assistance respectfully to people with DAFN.
  • The Outreach Brochure (also from Appendix H) is provided in a separate downloadable file for use and distribution by practitioners.
  • The Exercise Toolkit (from Appendix I), with checklists and materials to support a discussion-based exercise and a full-scale, operational exercise, is reproduced in Word to facilitate adaptation and use by practitioners.
  • The Prepared Scenario Vignettes (from Appendix J), which can be used to lay the foundation of a discussion-based or tabletop exercise.
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