National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)
Page 364
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 364
Page 365
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 365
Page 366
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 366
Page 367
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 367
Page 368
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 368
Page 369
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 369
Page 370
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 370
Page 371
Suggested Citation:"New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 371

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐68  New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT)  Case Study:  New York – Newark, NY‐NJ‐CT  Highlights: NJ TRANSIT has adopted an enterprise‐wide commitment to infrastructure and operational  resilience across modes and departments.  The agency’s resilience initiatives are being undertaken in  the context of Superstorm Sandy recovery and rebuilding.  The agency’s infrastructure and rolling stock  sustained significant damage during the storm.  Long term, NJ TRANSIT is focusing on resilience by  incorporating “designs and materials that can resist and survive weather events.”  The agency is also in  the process of designing and constructing NJ TRANSITGRID, “a first‐of‐its‐kind electrical micro‐grid  capable of supplying highly‐reliable power during storms or other times when the centralized power grid  or local power distribution networks are compromised;” and a Coast Storm Surge Emergency Warning  System in partnership with NOAA and Stevens Institute of Technology.  In the wake of Superstorm  Sandy, NJ TRANSIT put in place a very detailed, mode‐specific, Comprehensive Emergency Management  Plan that is publically available online. NJ TRANSIT utilizes FTA’s Hazard Mitigation Cost Effectiveness  Tool to evaluate resilience as part of its capital planning process and adopted new service cessation and  rapid recovery procedures.  Key Resiliency Drivers   Events including September 11th, the 2003 Northeast (NE) Blackout, Tropical Storm (TS) Irene and, Superstorm Sandy  Availability of federal recovery funding to support project implementation  Leadership  Availability of models and technology  National requirements to support safety, reliability, and economy Key Successes   Robust commitment of the NJT enterprise to resilience  Implementation of the NJT Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) that is flexible, adaptable, and scalable  Application of the CEMP, evaluation of results  Strategic approach to capital planning and programming for resilience, across all modes  Training across the NJT enterprise in emergency response, and recovery  Active communication concerning design, progress, and benefits of resilience projects via an interactive web site, public information sessions and stakeholder engagement  Utilization of models and GIS data to support decisions concerning priorities for actions promoting resilience  Integrated approach to resilience at two levels: Resilient infrastructure initiatives that have independent utility, while also interdependent (capital projects); and Resilient operations (CEMP)

B‐69  Agency Details  Geographic Location  East Coast  Modes Operated  MB, CR, LR, CB, DR  Vehicles Operated (all modes) (2014)  5,019  Annual Unlinked Trips (2014)  271.0 million  Hazard Examples   Flood, Winter Storms, Superstorms/Tropical  Storms, Extreme Heat, High Winds/Lightning,  Storm Surge/Wave Action, Sea Level Rise, Cyber  Disruption, Power Failure  Background  NJ TRANSIT is the nation's largest statewide public transportation system providing more than 938,500  weekday trips on 257 bus routes, three light rail lines, 12 commuter rail lines and through Access Link  paratransit service. It is the third largest transit system in the country with 165 rail stations, 62 light rail  stations and more than 19,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.   NJT also administers several publicly funded transit programs for people with disabilities, senior citizens,  and people living in the state's rural areas who have no other means of transportation.  In addition, the  agency provides support and equipment to privately owned contract bus carriers.  New Jersey is a comparatively small state–ranked 47th in terms of total area.  However, it is ranked 11th  in terms of population. With more than 8.7 million residents, New Jersey is the most densely populated  state in the nation with almost 1,200 residents per square mile.  New Jersey is bordered by New York  State to the north, Pennsylvania to the west, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Delaware River and  Bay to the south.  NJT provides public transportation services throughout the State, including in urban,  suburban and rural areas.  The agency has a service area of 5,325 square miles, which covers more than  70 percent of the state’s land area.  It provides bus, commuter rail, and light rail transit, linking major  points in New Jersey, New York, and Philadelphia.  New Jersey’s monthly average temperatures range  widely across the different regions of the state, with average summertime highs in the mid to upper  eighties to wintertime lows in the single digits to low thirties.  New Jersey receives an average of 46.94  inches of precipitation annually.    New Jersey is vulnerable to a number of natural and weather‐related hazards, including:  high heat days  during summer months, significant rain events that cause urban street and riverine flooding, high winds,  regular recurring tidal flooding, and coastal storm surges from nor’easters and tropical cyclones.  Winter  storms can bring significant snowfall coupled with winds as well as icing events that impact both  roadways and power lines.  The last major storms to impact New Jersey were Tropical Storm Irene in  2011 and Superstorm Sandy in October 2012.  In particular, Superstorm Sandy devastated parts of the  state; however, both storms caused widespread infrastructure damage.   New Jersey has also been  subject to localized and regional power failures.    NJT’s current resiliency initiatives are being undertaken in the context of Superstorm Sandy recovery  and rebuilding.  The agency’s infrastructure and rolling stock sustained significant damage during the 

B‐70  storm.  In the immediate aftermath of the storm, NJT’s recovery strategy involved efforts to “identify  damaged infrastructure, deploy resources to effect immediate repairs and to make service restoration a  priority.”  Intermediate recovery efforts focused on protecting vulnerable infrastructure and resources  by implementing “near term protection measures.”  Long term, the agency is focusing on resiliency by  incorporating “designs and materials that can resist and survive weather events.”  NJT has programmed  $768 million dollars repairing damaged infrastructure in a resilient manner ($625m) and investing in  long‐term resiliency ($143m).  Funding sources for the agency’s resiliency capital program include Sandy  Recovery funds from FTA and state transportation trust fund and partially from insurance proceeds.    In addition, in September 2014, it was announced that NJT had been awarded $1.276 billion in resiliency  funding as part of a competitive grant program sponsored by the FTA.  A portion of these funds will be  used to design and construct NJ TRANSITGRID, “a first‐of‐its‐kind electrical micro‐grid capable of  supplying highly‐reliable power during storms or other times when the centralized power grid or local  power distribution networks are compromised.”  The micro‐grid will incorporate renewable energy,  distributed generation, and other technologies to provide resilient power to key NJT stations,  maintenance facilities, bus garages, and other buildings.  Through a micro‐grid design, NJTGRID will also  provide resilient electric traction power to allow NJT trains on critical corridors, including portions of the  Northeast Corridor, to continue to operate even when the traditional grid fails.2   Additional to the NJ TRANSITGRID, this funding will be used to support four other projects that will  construct a resilient river crossing; help maintain passenger rail operations before, during and after a  weather event; protect communications and safety infrastructure; and, provide for the safe storage and  rapid re‐deployment of equipment.  Although, these projects will be discussed in more detail later, it is  important to note that they are each an element in a larger strategy of statewide resilience.  The  separate utility of each project is obvious, but when viewed from a wider perspective, their  interdependencies become clear.  A project that can help passenger rail remain in operation longer  during a weather event and restore service after one is only possible if rolling stock is stored in a  protected location; infrastructure is in place that can weather storms; and, electric power is available  even if the regional grid has failed.    Policy and Administration  In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, NJT leadership has been forceful and effective in advancing  enterprise‐wide resiliency adoption.  NJT emergency plan evolved into a strategy based on lessons  learned which included the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan to ensure resilient transit  operations.  NJT has:    Established and staffed a new Resilience Program within the NJT Capital Planning and Programs Department.  Expanded its commitment to emergency preparedness and resilience training and retraining. Those initiatives emanate from a resilience commitment that is comprehensive and intense,  mainstreaming resilience as an integral part of NJT capital planning and operations.  2 http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2939

B‐71  The Resilience Program is within the Capital Planning and Programs Department.  The staff is  responsible for administering federal funds dedicated to resiliency projects.  The Resilience Program  works with project managers and others across the enterprise, using a matrix management approach.    NJT brings on expertise as needed via staff hires and consultants.  Metrics to Support Policy and Administration  To evaluate the success of the Resilience Program, NJT applied the metrics embedded in the Federal  Transit Administration’s Hazard Mitigation Cost Effectiveness Tool.  The tool estimates potential benefits  and costs in terms of damage to fixed structures and rolling stock, costs associated with response and  recovery/repairs; and “other” costs such as the projected number of commuter delay hours that are  saved per day because of investments being made.  Those hours are then multiplied by $19.40 per hour  to provide one estimate of the value of an investment.   Communications of the Resilience Program  NJT highlights its Resilience Program to the public in several ways, including:   Periodic updates to the NJT Board of Directors on specific resiliency projects.  Creation and maintenance of a public website, www.njtransitresilienceprogram.com.   The site includes: o The NJT Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan o Status reports on the progress of projects that enhance resilience of the system o Environmental assessments and impact statements  Staff presentations at community meetings and at professional forums. Cooperation with Other Agencies  NJT, through its Resilience Program and NJT Police Office of Emergency Management, regularly  cooperates with a range of federal, state and local agencies.  These include: United States Department  of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory on the NJ TRANSITGRID project; the Federal Transit  Administration; Federal Emergency Management Administration; the NJ Governor’s Office; NJ Office of  Homeland Security and Preparedness; NJ State Police and the NJ Office of Emergency Management;  other state agencies as needed and various county and municipal public safety officials, including local  offices of emergency management.  NJT, along with the NJ Department of Transportation, serve as the  co‐leads of Emergency Support Function #1 (ESF1) – Transportation, under the State Emergency  Operations Plan.  As part of its ESF1 responsibilities, NJT provided emergency bus transportation to  support the evacuation of critical transportation needs populations living in coastal communities and  the transport of first responders during both Tropical Storm Irene and Superstorm Sandy.   Asset Management  NJT has an Asset Management Plan/Program and is working on bringing it into compliance with MAP21  requirements.  The plan addresses all transit modes.  Resilience is being incorporated in state of good  repair decision making, especially in terms of flood resiliency.  The asset management system utilized  separate, mode‐specific databases.  A unified, enterprise‐wide database is currently in development   NJT already has good information on the location and state of good repair of bus and rail rolling stock,  stations and terminals, underground storage tanks, and diesel generators.  Enhancements are under 

B‐72  way that will afford NJT visibility of both inventory and state of good repair of all assets and  infrastructure.  The agency does maintain a geo‐referenced inventory of assets and has mapped the asset in relation to  FEMA Flood Rate Insurance Maps (FIRM) and Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Superstorms (SLOSH)  vulnerability. In addition, the agency continues to assess the vulnerability of its infrastructure, assets  and operations to failures in the electric grid or disruptions due to cyber‐attacks.  High heat days are already part of NJTs Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for LRT and Heavy Rail.   Rail inspection protocols are part of regular safety protocols.  De‐icing is also part of SOPs to avoid  sagging catenary.  Running trains to prevent icing and clear tracks is a standard practice.    Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  NJT continuously maintains or replaces century‐old infrastructure – much of it inherited from  predecessor railroads – while at the same time trying to make its property resilient to current and future  hazards.  The costs associated with upgrading/replacing century‐old infrastructure components are seen  as a barrier to resiliency implementation.  Other challenges to resiliency improvements include the fact  that many stations and terminals are historic resources and not easily modified or replaced with modern  equipment or features.   In addition, NJT recognizes that many of the improvements made for the  purpose of increasing resilience also have more general benefits for safety, reliability and economics of  service.  NJT’s multiyear, multimodal comprehensive capital program of projects is intended to repair Sandy  damage and complete system‐wide resiliency projects. In particular, NJT is focused on improving the  resiliency of its system assets to flooding and storm surge and to ensure power is available to support  and maintain key assets before, during and after disasters.  The overall program comprises a variety of projects and programs, including:    Construction of Delco Lead Train Safe Haven Service and Inspection Facility. This project includes construction of a service and inspection facility and storage tracks for trains in County Yard, an existing railroad property adjacent to the Northeast Corridor in New Brunswick, NJ. It also includes improvements to the Delco Lead, which is adjacent to both the County Yard property and the Northeast Corridor between New Brunswick and North Brunswick Township, for storage of NJT equipment during severe weather events.  Filling of the Hoboken Long Slip Canal.  Much of the flooding that inundated NJT’s Hoboken rail yard during Sandy was caused by storm surge entering through the Long Slip Canal.  As part of an FTA grant, NJT will fill in the Long Slip Canal that runs by the Hoboken Terminal and yards.  Six new tracks will be installed on the land created by filling the canal, and a major source of vulnerability will have been eliminated.  Replacing the Raritan River Drawbridge.  Recognizing that bridge resiliency is essential to safe and reliable operations along its North Jersey Coast Line (NJCL), NJT is replacing the Raritan River Drawbridge (River Draw), an existing century‐old swing bridge that carries almost 10,000 daily NJT customers on NJCL trains over the Raritan River and is a critical link to the employment

B‐73  centers of north Jersey and Manhattan and the southern beaches and attractions of the Jersey  shore. Taking advantage of structural design approaches and materials that are able to  withstand ocean surge forces and saltwater immersion, the new Drawbridge will be significantly  less vulnerable to severe weather events. Proposed components to achieve infrastructure  resilience include new reinforced concrete piers on piles; new steel superstructure; new drive  motor and electrical controls; tie‐ins to existing track; vertical adjustment of existing track; and  electrical catenary relocation.   Projects that will raise vulnerable infrastructure above flood levels.  NJT has completed an analysis of all infrastructure items damaged by Superstorm Sandy (substations, switches, other electronics, etc.) that can be elevated above flood levels and is systematically raising these items to reduce the risk of damage from future flooding.  This includes raising an entire electrical substation to the second floor of a building NJT owns. To facilitate this effort, NJT has adopted a design standard for construction that specifies that facilities and equipment be built at an elevation of two and one‐half feet above base flood elevation.  The general standard in New Jersey is one foot above base flood elevation.  Projects designed to protect assets that can’t be raised above flood levels.  Many essential components of rail transportation, including fixed facilities and assets such as stations, signals, wiring, and yards cannot be elevated.  To protect these assets, NJT has undertaken a systematic effort to flood proof facilities and assets where feasible and where not, to develop procedures that will facilitate rapid repair/recovery of item functionality post event. For example, NJT has designed signal and switch technology and developed a zone‐based plan so that it can be rapidly removed when flooding is expected and returned to service after flooding has subsided.  In addition, NJT is investing several million dollars to protect and harden its Meadows Maintenance Complex and Yard against inundation and infiltration with raised barriers forming a perimeter wall and, pumps.  Development of NJ TRANSITGRID.  NJT is keenly focused on ensuring the availability of power and energy to support its operations and services before, during and after emergency events and natural disaster.  Sole reliance on public utilities to provide power is insufficient, and relying on diesel generators for redundant power is not adequate to maintain continuity of public transit operations. After Sandy, NJT participated in the New Jersey State Public Utilities Working Group to develop a comprehensive approach to provide resilient power sources.  The idea for developing NJ TRANSITGRID grew out of the working group meeting. Subsequently, NJT received a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (USDOE) that included $1 million worth of technical assistance from experts at Sandia National Laboratories who normally work on guaranteeing the resilience of electrical power grids at U. S. military bases. The Sandia consultants worked with NJT for a period of a year and three‐part energy resilience strategy that includes:  a) Construction of its own central power plant capable of producing at least 100 megawatts utilizing gas turbines; b) Installation of a resilient power transmission and distribution architecture including redundant substations and distributed generation capabilities at specific facilities including stations, bus garages, and ferry terminals; and, c) Creative methods

B‐74  of storing power in batteries in non‐revenue service vehicles. The power is to be collected  during off‐peak hours.   All the projects taken as a whole are a package of improvements that will protect assets and operations,  and, speed recovery and a more rapid return to full services, including key elements of the bus network  and light rail, commuter rail, and paratransit services.    Finance   NJ TRANSIT does not have a separate process for financing resiliency efforts.  Resiliency requirements are considered in the planning, programming, and budgeting of projects.  NJT accumulates the costs of damage due to weather‐related events by establishing separate accounts  for charging labor and other costs allocated to recovery. Those costs form the basis for insurance claims  and for claims to the Federal Transit Administration’s Emergency Relief Program.  System Planning  NJT’s planning for resilience includes all departments of the enterprise.  It is also integrated with the  activities of the NJ State Police, Office of Emergency Management.  NJT uses modeling, including  inundation models to assess infrastructure and service vulnerability to flooding and storm surge.  In  addition, NJT is developing its own in‐house modeling capability.  In partnership with researchers at  Stevens Institute of Technology and its consultant, BEM, NJT is building out a Coastal Storm Surge  Emergency Warning System for its Hoboken and Kearny facilities.    The system will use active tide gauge data to model the potential impacts of storm surge in real time.  The system will map effects of potential surges on NJT property, including the effects of surges on areas  as small as three meters by three meters.  When the system is built out, NJT will be able to correlate  surge forecasts to specific assets at Hoboken Terminal and Kearny and potential impacts of a surge.    The totality of data collection and modeling tools enable NJT to correlate predictions of storm surges  and flooding with the latitude, longitude, and elevation of specific NJT assets. That will, for example,  inform the decision to implement the plan for removing components of switching systems to protect  from likely flooding.  Operations and Maintenance  NJT evaluates data from regular maintenance inspections to access the condition of its infrastructure  upon which the assumptions of the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan are based.  In  preparation for a severe weather event, inspections are conducted by operations to identify specific  conditions of infrastructure.  Emergency Management Planning   NJT’s emergency management functions are coordinated through the New Jersey Transit Police Office of  Emergency Management.  Since, 2014, NJT formally promulgates its CEMP annually.  Based on an all  hazards, whole‐community approach to emergency preparedness, the CEMP includes a Basic Plan that  sets an overall concept of operations for managing emergency situations and assigns responsibilities to  NJT departments and personnel in terms of their roles during emergency events.  In addition to the 

B‐75  Basic Plan, the CEMP includes six annexes that provide guidance on preparedness, response and short‐ term recovery.  A Business Continuity Plan with six similar annexes for operational continuity is under  development.  Guidance regarding business continuity in terms of NJT’s corporate/administrative  functions, the functions of NJT Police as well as the operation of NJT’s commuter rail, light rail, access  link, bus services and information technology immediately before, during and after an emergency event  is included    In addition to the CEMP, NJT has also developed redundancy in terms of its emergency operations  center with a new mobile emergency operations center.  The agency has also upgraded its  communications interoperability; and has placed renewed focus on building and sustaining relationships  with regional, state and local government agencies/jurisdictions that enhance preparedness and  improve outcomes when a disaster occurs.  In addition, NJT has undertaken the construction of a new,  state‐of‐the‐art Emergency Operations Center.     Finally, NJT maintains a robust enterprise‐wide emergency preparedness training program.  Annual  training on the CEMP and its associated annexes is also conducted.  As part of the program NJT  personnel from across modes and departments regularly participate in immersive, scenario‐driven,  tabletop simulations and exercises through the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX).   Additional exercises, tabletop through full scale – some of which are FRA‐mandated – are held  throughout the year.  Members whose skills are essential to response and recovery attend more than  once.    The winter storm of January 2016 resulted in the activation of the CEMP, including several of its various  annexes.  Activation of the plan improved outcomes and reduced customer disruptions.  Services were  shut down for approximately 24 hours and restored on a rolling basis, with all services recovered within  48 hours.  Activation of the plan included a provision for shutting down service to eliminate the risk of bus  accidents on snow‐covered streets in low‐visibility conditions and of stranding passengers in trains or  buses in a hazardous environment.  Shutting down service also allowed for reserving and allocating  resources to protection of the system and recovery.  Success of the CEMP operations reflected the fact  that operations staff and managers of all transit modes had been trained in CEMP procedures.    After The winter storm of January 2016, NJT Office of Emergency Management facilitated an after‐ action “hot wash” with management to discuss and detail how NJT operations performed under plan  activation and how the CEMP might be changed to improve outcomes even further.  The hot wash was  supported by hardware and software that records decisions and actions on an active basis during each  emergency event.  There is also an infrastructure impact assessment during and immediately after the  event that assists in understanding what is needed to restore services effectively.    Based on the experience of NJT with the winter storm of January 2016, NJT rated itself well prepared for  responding and recovering from winter storm events. They rate themselves as progressing toward  becoming “very resilient” overall.  

Next: New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!