National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)
Page 409
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 409
Page 410
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 410
Page 411
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 411
Page 412
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 412
Page 413
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 413
Page 414
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 414
Page 415
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 415
Page 416
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 416
Page 417
Suggested Citation:"Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 417

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐113  Swedish Transportation Administration (STA)  Case Study:  Borlänge, Sweden  Highlights:  While not a direct provider of urban transit services, as the national transportation authority  for the country of Sweden, STA is actively engaged in a variety of activities related to resilience planning,  engineering, maintenance, and operations across a range of transportation modes.  The agency is  primarily concerned with flooding, coastal storm surge and sea level rise, and ensuring the “robustness”  of transit operations and infrastructure.  Awareness of the impacts of natural hazard related threats, the  needs for practice adaptation, and the benefits of creating culture of resilience within the STA started  with planners and engineers working in the middle‐tier maintenance divisions of the administration.  A  key area of the STA’s resilience efforts was the development of agency‐wide Climate Change Adaptation  Strategy and Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan.  Key Resiliency Drivers   Recognition by field‐level staff that natural hazard related restoration, repair, and reconstruction projects were growing large and more common;  Acceptance that global climate change is real and is already effecting the country in numerous ways and, most notably to the STA, carrying out of their daily mission; and  European Union – wide efforts to raise awareness of a need to adapt to climate change. Key Successes   Development of an administration‐wide Climate Change Adaptation Strategy and Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan;  These two documents give the STA a structured approach to understand, evaluate, and manage the needs and activities related to climate change within their organization; and  Achieving executive and leadership –level support to address and incorporate resiliency needs more widely throughout the organization. Key Lessons Learned   There needs to be coordination between all jurisdictional levels of government that take climate change adaption into account during the planning, design, and construction of transportation projects;  Climate change leaders need to exist at all level of transportation agencies;  If there are no specific resources (money and people) allocated to the climate change adaptation work it is difficult to actually work efficiently.  The STA is still struggling with this issue and this is also the reason the strategy and the action plan development has been a lengthy process.  Theses policy documents could have been prepared much earlier if dedicated funding was available to create them.  In fact the STA still lacks funds for actually carry out the activities in the Action Plan (17 such activities are planned for 2016);

B‐114   Awareness, understanding, and realization of the threats of climate change and how they effected the organization are key in the development of administration‐wide climate change adaptation strategies; and  Official strategic and action plan documents give a structured approach to understand, evaluate, and manage the needs and activities related to climate change within their organization. Administration Details  Geographic Location  International (Northern Europe)  Modes Operated  HR, CR, FB, Other (highway, civil aviation)  Vehicles Operated [all modes](2013)  Annual Unlinked Trips (2013)  Typical Hazards  Flood, Winter Storms, Extreme Cold, Strom Surge/Wave  Action, Sea Level Rise, Other (landslides, dam failures)   Background:  Although it is a national transportation administration, the Swedish Transport  Administration operates similar to a State‐level Department of Transportation in the United States.  The  STA was founded in April 2010 by combining the operations of the Swedish Road Administration and the  Swedish Rail Administration, as well as parts of the Swedish Maritime Administration, Swedish Civil  Aviation Administration (or Luftfartsverket (LFV)) and the Swedish Institute for Communications  Analysis.  Some operational responsibilities were also transferred to new commercial companies,  particularly for road and railway construction and maintenance as well as the management of airport  operations.   The size and activities of the STA reflect the geography and population of the country.  The land area of  Sweden encompasses about 174,000 square miles (450,295 square kilometers), somewhat larger than  the State of California, and has a population of about 9.6 million people, about the population of the  State of Michigan.    Much of the country is rural and heavily (about 70 percent) forested with somewhat  less than 10 percent of the landmass used for agriculture.  About 90 percent of Swedish population lives  in the southern half of the country with about 85 percent living in city areas.  This results in the vast  percentage of travel activity being concentrated in the major cities of Stockholm, Gothenburg, and  Malmo in the southern half of the country.  Sweden is also divided into 21 counties with an  Administrative Board appointed by the national government.   The STA’s purview extends over all state owned roads, rail, air and shipping modes in Sweden. As such, it  maintains a wide multimodal authority in the country. The STA is also responsible for the planning,  construction, operation, and maintenance of state roads and railways.    As part of its infrastructure  responsibilities the STA maintains, about 7,400 miles (11,900 kilometers) of railway tracks; 40 ferry lines;  16,000 bridges (including 3,781 railway bridges), and 61,000 miles (98,400 kilometers) of state roads (a  third of which are unpaved gravel roads) with and employee work force of approximately 6,500 people.    It does not, however, have jurisdiction over any local or regional public transportation or municipal  transit systems. 

B‐115  In terms of hazard vulnerability, the STA is generally concerned with all hazards.  However, the focus of  the majority of their resilience effort is centered on natural hazards, most specifically those associated  with water‐related conditions such as torrential rainfall, river, lake, and coastal flooding; as well as  avalanches, mud flows, and various implications from sea level rise in coastal areas, particularly in the  southern part of the country.  Based on history and experience, other concerns include landslides and  winter weather and with respect to climate change, the thawing of permafrost in the northern part of  the country which is leading to soil stability issues.  The information collected and reviewed for this Case Study was gathered from several sources, most  notably from a phone interview Dr. Eva Liljegren, who works both for the STA Maintenance and Planning  Divisions.  Dr. Liljegren is responsible for coordinating climate change adaptation, which includes the  creation of policies, strategies, and action plans for the administration.  Links and citations to additional  documents reviewed and used to support the development of this Case Study can also be found in the  “References” section of this case description.    Policy and Administration  Summary:   The STA is the national transportation administration under the Swedish Ministry of  Enterprise and Innovation.  The organization has five major “Business Areas” (although they are often  referred to as “Divisions” in English, “Business Areas” is the correct term) organized as “drainpipes.”   This in effect means that authority goes from the top of the STA down to the field, with different levels.  The director for each Business Area reports directly to the General Director but each Area is then  organized in different levels, from the top to the bottom.   In terms of Maintenance, there are six  regional districts.  The districts are responsible for the tendering process with contractors.  Each District  also has project leaders who work as the contractor’s counterparts, although all actual work is carried  out by contractors.   The first division to recognize and react to climate change issues at Trafikverket were people working in  the Maintenance Divisions.  These included, for example, geotechnical engineers, hydrologists and  maintenance experts whose duties were most frequently and directly affected by the impacts of natural  hazards.  Recent experience has shown, however, that many of these individuals were not enough high  up in the organization to be able to influence or take important decisions.  Interestingly, these staff  members were also not far enough down the chain of activities to make direct and appreciable  differences in the work carried actually out by the contractor.  This paradigm is viewed as a primary  reason that it has been (and still is) difficult to work with climate change at Trafikverket.   The STA does not have an official definition of “resilience.” In fact, the word “resilience” is not used in  the STA policy documentation because they feel the term is too vague, broad, and its concepts not well  understood.  Rather, the administration couches the concept of resilience within the ideas of “climate  change adaptation” and “robustness” because these terms are clearer and their meanings better  understood.    Thus, although STA terminology differs from the National Academies definition of  resiliency, it could be suggested the key ideas are largely similar.  A noted shortcoming of the robustness  definition, however, was that the STA’s thinking with a narrower focus may be inhibiting their ability to  take advantage of the “learning aspects” of resiliency in which infrastructure is improved and “built back  better” to be more resistant to hazards as lessons are learned over time.  

B‐116  Although the STA does not have a policy that addresses “resilience,” it has formed an administration‐ wide policy to more specifically address “climate change adaptation.”  The policy is documented in  “Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation” (STA 2014).  As its title suggests, the policy focuses exclusively  on natural hazards and not man‐made disasters or hazard conditions.  These are addressed separately in  security‐related policies.  To support the implementation of the policies outlined in this Strategy, the  STA is about to publish an Action Plan.  The Action Plan is a key document for the administration  because it breaks down the conceptual vagueness of the Strategy into tangible activities.  The Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation, the parent agency of the STA, sets the direction for resilience  prioritization, although again, they also use the term robustness.  Although, neither agency has a formal  division, committee, or individual designated as being responsible for resiliency, there is a prevailing  view that all individuals within the organization should have a stake and an interest in robustness.   Currently, there is an effort to establish a distributed set or loose network of robustness “experts”  throughout the organization rather than creating a single centralized authority within the  administration.  These individual experts would maintain their traditional job functions (planning,  maintenance, bridges, etc.) within the organization, but when called upon, would serve as the  designated domain‐specific counterparts to the STA Coordinator of Climate Change Adaption (currently  Dr. Liljegren).  In addition to this informal group of experts, located within or close to its headquarters,  the STA is also establishing a network of regional climate change adaptation leaders who will reside in  their current locations (one in each of the six STA regions) and lead and coordinate climate change  adaptation activities in addition to their regular job duties.  Similar to most agencies throughout the world, the most significant barrier to implementing resiliency  policies, performance, and/or standards within the STA is a lack of funding.  Perhaps just as important,  however, it was pointed out that resilience thinking also lacked a formal “place” within the structure of  the administration.  This means that, historically, there has been no designated leader to champion for  the needs and issues related to climate change adaptation and ask related questions, particularly at a  high level.  It was suggested that this came from a lack of awareness, understanding, and/or realization  of the threats of climate change – which are now already being felt in Sweden ‐ and how they effected  the organization.  There was also a fundamental misunderstanding of the difference between “climate  mitigation” and “climate adaptation” and the needs for and roles of each.   ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  CALLOUTBOX/SPOTLIGHT: There are differences between the ideas of “climate mitigation” and “climate  adaptation.”  Each responds to the threats posed by climate change in distinctly different ways.  Broadly  defined, climate mitigation includes activities and actions that seek to eliminate or reduce the long‐term  risk and hazards of climate change to property and human life, health, and safety.  In contrast, climate  adaptation encompasses and range of activities that seek to adjust systems to mitigate the effects of  climate change (including climate variability and extremes).  These may include activities that moderate  potential damage and take advantage of opportunities, but may also require and/or coping with the  consequences.  ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  Although these types of issues have begun to change with the recently created half–time Climate  Change Adaption Coordinator position in the administration, other issues remain, particularly between 

B‐117  the regional/municipal levels and the nation level.  When local projects involve climate change –related  issues, there is not a designated coordinator for the STA.  And despite having adaption‐specific  expertise, the lack of knowledge of local conditions often precludes involvement.  It is expected that in  the future, national policies on key issues (amount of expected sea level rise, for example) can be used  to establish design parameters in local areas.  These are top priorities in the Action Plan which is (or will  soon be) the most important tool to measure or report resilience‐related efforts.  The Action Plan will cover many areas, including what data and information are required, prioritizing  what needs to be done, and communicate these activities and their results with the policy makers and  the public.  While this is currently under development, the STA uses internal methods like distributing  articles through their intranet and HR training to update its employees on resiliency‐related issues.  To  communicate with the broader public, the STA also uses traditional web based tools like web pages as  well as social media.  Another important communication platform for the STA is its involvement with the  national climate change adaptation committee, which includes high level representatives from key  administrations (constructions, geology, etc.) who meet twice a year to discuss needs and concerns.  Tools:   STA Climate Change Adaptation Strategy  STA Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan Successes:   Strategy and Action Plan will give a structured approach to understand, evaluate, and manage the needs and activities related to climate change within their organization Lessons Learned:   When local projects involve climate change related issues, there is not a designated coordinator for the STA  Lack of STA local knowledge of local conditions often precludes involvement. Asset Management  Summary:   Although the STA estimates that the infrastructure under their jurisdiction includes 100,000  kilometers (km) of roads, 12,000 km of railroads, 25,000 bridges, and about 300,000 culverts spread  over a vast geographic area, they do not current maintain a centralized comprehensive asset  management and inventory system.  Thus, assets for the various modes and components (such as  pavements, railways, etc.) are managed mainly as separate systems.  Among the most advanced of  these are the asset management plans for bridges and tunnels. Known as the Bridges and Tunnels  Management system or (BaTMan), the tool focuses on management, inspection, and planning of bridges  and other structures  [https://batman.vv.se/batman/logon/logon.aspx?url=https://batman.vv.se/batman/].  It contains a  searchable database of construction and maintenance activities and supports the inspection,  procurement, and operation of each asset.   Inventories are typically conducted at different time cycles and what specifically they include ranges  widely and depends on the specific system.  Included in this are resilience‐related activities like 

B‐118  vulnerability assessments, the specifics of which are covered in the strategic Action Plan.   However, the  STA maintains a range of systems for location‐specific monitoring of hazards.  These include systems for  monitoring and providing warnings for landslides as well as to warning of railroad track switch freezing  and warming systems for the switching mechanism.  In addition to routine weather forecasts the STA  also maintains a network of about 600 local monitoring stations throughout the country to collect  weather data and provide warnings of snowfall, fog, and rain conditions.    A newer system (AnDa) is used to inventory culverts under STA authority  [http://iug.buildingsmart.org/resources/itm‐and‐iug‐meetings‐2013‐munich/infra‐room/bim‐in‐ swedish‐transport‐administration].  As part of the inspections using this system, it is possible to make  dimension measurements to assess adequacy under various storm conditions.  Maintenance on STA roads is performed exclusively by contractors.  These groups are also tasked with  monitoring conditions and reporting conditions back to the STA as part of their daily inspections.    Tools:   Bridges and Tunnels Management (BaTMan) system is used for the management, inspection, and planning of bridges and other structures  STA maintains a range of systems for location‐specific monitoring of hazards, including systems for monitoring and providing warnings for landslides and railroad track switch freezing  AnDa system is used to inventory culverts under STA authority and using dimension measurements from field inspections determine their adequacy under various storm conditions Lessons Learned:   STA does not maintain a centralized comprehensive asset management and inventory system. Assets for the various modes and components are managed as separate systems. Project Development, Infrastructure Design, and Construction  Summary:   In terms of capital project development, infrastructure design, and construction, the STA has  been updating infrastructure design standards to address changing climate‐related requirements and  needs.  These are primarily related to water events more than other hazards.  For example, the  administration has recently updated their standards with regard to hydraulic design for bridges and  culverts.  This has not, however, required any change in the types of materials or methods used in  construction.    Although the STA does not operate transit rail systems, it does operate heavy rail for intercity passenger  and freight rail networks.  The planning and design of high‐speed railways was noted, in particular, as  requiring climate change to be taken into consideration.  Resilient design of high‐speed rail systems has  garnered high initial interest for a variety of reasons.  Most notably because it is more sophisticated and  constructed to higher design standards than those used for heavy rail and highway modes because the  nature of the high‐speed rail operation brings potentially higher levels of risk.  Since several lines  currently exist or are being planned very near coastal areas of the country, they are also susceptible to  storms and sea level rise.   Thus, any high‐speed rail construction or improvement project involves major  financial investments.   

B‐119  In terms of the environmental review, project development process, and consideration of locations for  new facilities and equipment; practices vary someone within the STA.  As policies are continuing to  evolve, the specifics of individual projects are varying with respect to these changing considerations.   Often, how much climate adaptation related features are included in a project depends on the people  involved in the projects and their familiarity and awareness of climate change and the need to consider  its impact in project development.    In terms of longer‐term planning to resist climate effect effects, the STA does not currently have  programs to elevate and harden infrastructure to withstand greater or more frequently occurring  flooding.  However, it was noted that the administration is involved in a project in a southern coastal  community where the roads are being elevated to permit the road embankment to provide levee‐like  protection from flooding.  This project, a first for the STA, will create roads similar of those seen in  Holland and south Louisiana where road serve a dual, transportation‐flood protection, purpose.  Tools:   Roads elevated to permit the road embankment to provide levee‐like protection from flooding similar of those in Holland and south Louisiana. Key Successes:   Infrastructure design and construction the STA has been updated infrastructure design standards to address changing requirements and needs Operations and Maintenance  Summary:   From an operations and maintenance perspective, the STA has been active for some time in  resilience‐oriented thinking and activities.  As it was pointed it out earlier, much of the initial integration  of resiliency practice come from the lower levels of the maintenance divisions.  As such, the STA has  numerous plans and procedures in place to rapidly and temporarily reconstruct damaged infrastructure.   Among their most effective tools are the use “Bailey bridges” to temporarily span washed out sections  of road.  These are portable, pre‐fabricated, truss bridges originally developed by for military use.   Similarly, the STA uses temporary power stations, ferries, and trucks passed down to them from the  military.    The STA also uses and has plans to construct more alternative railroads and roadways to temporally  carry travelers while damaged systems are restored.   It has been recognized that difficulties can occur  when temporary and detour roads are not designed to accommodate heavy vehicles and/or hazardous  cargo.  Detour roads can also be susceptible to the same hazardous conditions (floods) if they are close  by the originally damaged road.  As a result, planning is beginning to take these types of considerations  into account.  Emergency communication and power systems are used during times of need, but they are generally  similar to those of routine periods and they tend to have limited capabilities.  For example, temporary  power generation systems are only meant to be used on temporary bases; operating for several hours  until full or partially services are restored.  Communication systems span a number of different systems 

B‐120  including broadcast channels, especially emergency radio broadcasts that preempt routine content, as  well as web pages and social media applications.  The STA uses regular maintenance and inspection activities to monitor the condition of potentially  vulnerable infrastructure and assets.  This is especially so for bridges and tunnels because of their  criticality within the system and the capabilities made possible by the BatMan system (described  earlier).  While these inspections include functions and needs associated with resilience concepts, for  the most part, these review and assessment activities are part of routine practice and are not  necessarily aimed at resilience, specifically.  It is notable that contractors play large role in the inspection  efforts of the STA during the performance of their unrelated (though overlapping) contracted  maintenance duties.  Unfortunately, however, they are not perceived to be of as high quality or  thorough as inspections carried out directly by the STA.    A noted problem area of inspection was for roadway culverts, which are often in poor condition but not  always noted in inspection reporting.  Railways are viewed to be generally better inspected then  roadways because of more structured, mandated, and regulated maintenance programs.  In general, all  inspections programs, for road, rail, or other modes, are typically limited to intervals of the year outside  of winter and summer when either snow and ice or overgrown vegetation do not hamper visual  inspections.    As a final note related to inspection efforts, the STA seeks input from front‐line operations and  maintenance staff and managers regarding system performance during extreme weather and  emergency events to help inform resiliency decisions.  However, it is generally not formally organized.   While there is input from the practice leaders, maintenance staff, and contractors; work currently being  conducted as part of a doctoral dissertation research project has shown that there are no systematic  approaches or databases on specifics of response activities.  Thus, it makes it difficult for the STA to  assess how they investigate disasters and natural hazards and if they are improving responses and learn  from past difficulties.  Tools:   Bailey bridges are used to temporarily span washed out sections of roads and railways.  The STA uses temporary power stations, ferries, and trucks, some of which has passed down to them from the military.  Emergency communication and power systems are used during times of need, but are only meant to be used on short‐term, temporary bases until full or partially services are restored.  Doctoral dissertation research on effects and benefits gained from emergency related improvement projects. Key Lessons Learned:   Difficulties can occur when temporary and detour roads are not designed to accommodate heavy vehicles and/or hazardous cargo.  Detour roads can be susceptible to the same hazardous conditions (floods) if they are close by the originally damaged road.

B‐121   Contractors play large role in inspection, however, they are not perceived to the level of quality or thoroughness as inspections carried out directly by the STA.  Railways are better inspected then roadway because of more structured, mandated, and regulated maintenance programs.  It is difficult for the STA to assess how/if natural hazard improvement response because there are no systematic approaches or databases on specifics of response activities.  This makes also makes it difficult to learn from past events. References  1. Liljegren, E., I‐L. Dalstål, and B. Kristofersson. 2014. Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation. Swedish Transport Administration Document No. TDOK 2014:0882.  2. Swedish Transport Administration. Action Plan for Climate Change Adaptation. Document translation in progress for release in Summer 2016.  3. European Environment Agency. 2014. Adaptation of transport to climate change in Europe: Challenges and options across transport modes and stakeholders.  European Environment Agency Report  No. 8/2014, Copenhagen, Denmark.  4. Liljegren, E. and M. N. Rydstedt. 2015. Combining Risk Identification Methods in Order to Prevent Roads and Railways in Sweden Suffering From Increased Risk Due to Climate Change. PowerPoint  presentation.    5. Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency. 2013. Action Plan 2013–2015:  Swedish National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction. ISBN: 978‐91‐7383‐358‐5.  6. Andersson, L., S. Bergström, A. Bohman, G. Persson, A. Ohlsson , and L. van Well.  2014. Swedish Adaptation to Climate Change preparing the ground for Control Station 2015.  Presentation give to the  Climate Change Adaptation 3rd Nordic Conference, August 2014.  7. Andersson, L. Undated.  Implementation and Evaluation of the Swedish National Adaptation Strategy.  PowerPoint presentation.  8. Swedish Commission on Climate and Vulnerability. 2007. Sweden facing climate change threats and opportunities.  Swedish Government Official Report No. SOU 2007:60, ISBN 978‐91‐38‐22850‐0,  Stockholm, Sweden, 2007. 

Next: Transport for London (TfL) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!